Hunt as a Pack

Escouter

Featured in Jan 2012 Escouter

Wolf pack


Rudyard Kipling once said “For the strength of the pack is the wolf and the strength of the wolf is the pack.” This famous quote highlights that even though there is a strong leader it is always best to work together as a team to succeed and reach your goals.

Recruiters for the most part are lone wolves, content to recruit on their own and fill as many requisitions as they can. We are content to keep our recruiting and sourcing secrets and that pile of amazing contacts we have on our iPhone. Good recruiters are excited by the hunt, the thrill of the chase, the sight of their prey, but what if they could bring down bigger prey by working as a pack. I do not mean just working with other recruiters but working with the entire organization.

Organizations that are the best are organizations that engage talent and are always on the lookout for great talent. Not only do those companies have great recruiters, their entire team is an extension of the recruiting team.  They succeed because everyone in the company has an eye on identifying, wooing and closing talent. Everyone on the team has been trained in Recruiter 101. Can you replicate this for your company?

Let’s face it hiring managers know their business, expertise and the roles they are hiring for better than we do. But for the most part they really do not know how to screen and interview candidates properly. Many new managers actually are sabotaging your recruiting efforts by being rude to candidates, playing on their  iPhones and Blackberries during interviews, being condescending to candidates and in some cases putting your company at risk with sexual or discriminatory behaviours.

So why not leverage everyone to make our job easier and train and mentor employees and managers to become better recruiters. If you do this not only will you fill your requisitions faster, you will fill the roles with much better candidates. The great thing about this methodology is that it’s been proven to not only get better candidates but the candidates stay longer with the company due to the engagement of employees and hiring managers. So what should managers and employees learn at Recruiter 101.

Recruiting 101 consists of:

1. Role as a hiring manager or employee in recruiting for the company

Clearly define what their role and responsibilities are and where the recruiter and HR takeover.

2. High level roles that the company is trying to fill (highlight career site and more)

Provide this in a format that they can have with them at all times if possible and provide them with a web link with the same easy information for when they are on the road.

3. Share the corporate and talent brand

Hopefully you have one. It should be no more than a one pager and easy to remember. If it’s longer throw it out and start over again.

4. What does a Company X employee look like?

This should talk about what kind of employee should be hired to work and thrive at your company. Are they innovative, challenge the status quo, etc or do you want someone who marches to the beat of someone elses’s drum. Say it like it is and you will attract the right people and save yourself the trouble of having to fire them later on.

5. How to sell candidates on the job

Make sure managers have a cheat sheet of why candidates should work at your company. Is it the great career opportunities, training, compensation, other perks, the casual dress or something else. Whatever it is make sure you have it out on paper so everyone can memorize it and be ready to use it for approaching talent.

6. Creating a WOW candidate experience

Your team needs to know how to WOW a candidate throughout the hiring process. So clearly define what the approach is and what the expectations are with the candidates. How many days it will take to get back to them after an interview, offer management process, etc. Define the process as you would want to be treated. Make sure the timeframes are reasonable and fairly responsive.

7. Onboarding new-hires

Share the on boarding process, make sure managers know their responsibilities when it comes to new hires and that new hires must attend. The on boarding experience has been shown to dramatically increase the time an employee stays with a company.

8. Role of the recruiter and team.

The recruiting team is the lead on recruitment and are the key trainers and mentors for the organization. Clearly define the role you and your team will play so that there is no misinterpretations. The recruiting team must have the final say if there are differences during the recruiting process. Make sure this is supported by management.

9. Knowledge of career site, tools and recruiting programs (ie: referral programs, New Grad, Internships, etc…)

Make sure you provide a wallet card for managers on the key links and programs. Provide them with the key web links as well.

10. Knowledge of basic employment laws and policies

Provide a quick and dirty overview of these key areas. Once a year or whenever new legislation or policies come in to play make sure everyone is kept up to date.

Recruiting 101 should be a module of the company’s onboarding program and managers should receive a refresher once in a while and specifically when large recruitment drives are necessary. So train the pack so you can hunt as a pack. The results will amaze you and make your role much easier. Email me to let me know how your efforts are coming along and follow me on twitter at @guayfrancois

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About attackdefenddisrupt

An executive with over 20 years providing recruiting, talent management and IT solutions to corporations and government.
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